Cursos Ofrecidos

General Studies

ANTH 2302 Introduction to Archaeology (3-0-3)
This course is a general introduction to the field of archaeology. The course emphasizes methods of data collection, artifact and remains analysis, and a world review of major events in the development of past human civilizations.

ART 1301 Art Appreciation (3-0-3)
Broad introduction to the visual arts; surveys media representing the major cultural and historical periods, both Western and non-Western.

BIOL 1308 General Biology I (3-0-3)
This is the first course in a two-part introduction to the science of biology. This course focuses on the chemical basis of life, principles of inheritance, principles of evolution and biodiversity.

BIOL 1309 General Biology II (3-0-3)
This is the second course in a two-part introduction to the science of biology. This course focuses on evolution, animal and plant physiology, and ecology.

BIOL 2301 Anatomy and Physiology (3-0-3)
Study of the structure and function of human anatomy, including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, urinary, reproductive, respiratory, and circulatory systems.

ENGL 1301 Freshman Composition I (3-0-3)
This course focuses on academic writing. It reviews principles of English grammar and usage of clear and effective writing, the writing process, and of using sources for writing. It introduces the patterns of development, summary and paraphrase, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of multiple sources drawn from a variety of cultural and intellectual contexts. It includes extensive library research and documentation.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of INRW 0302 and/or ACT composite score of 23, SAT composite score of 800, ACCUPLACER scores of >79 Reading Comprehension, >80 Sentence Skills, and >5 WriterPlacer.

ENGL 1302 Freshman Composition II (3-0-3)
This course focuses on academic writing. It offers extensive writing practice in the use of logical and organizational patterns and introduces persuasion in written and visual form. It develops critical and analytical skills through multidisciplinary and multicultural readings, using extensive library research and documentation.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1301

ENGL 1306 English for Academics (Non-Native Speakers) (3-0-0)
Study to develop fundamental writing skills such as idea generation, organization, style, utilization of standard English, and revision. This course is specially designed for non-native English speakers.

ENGL 1307 English as a Second Language: Composition Skills (3-0-3)
Review and instruction in English grammar, usage, and vocabulary development with attention to composition and reading skills, for non-native speakers of English. This course does not satisfy the English requirements for any degree program. Placement in this course is determined by language and writing tests given when the student enrolls in the University.

ENGL 2306 World Literature (3-0-3)
A study of the literature of countries other than the United States. The class will study selected works from writers like Cervantes, Fuentes, Paz, Unamuno, Shakespeare, Milton, Homer, Dante, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy, and giving attention to selected works of non-Western literature.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and 1302

ENGL 2326 American Literature (3-0-3)
A study of the literature of the United States, emphasizing the work of writers such as Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, Hemingway, Faulkner, Morrison and other authors who write from the African-American and Hispanic-American experience (Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Villaseñor, Sandra Cisneros and others).
Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and 1302

ENGL 3301 Advanced Writing and Research (3-0-3)
Students will receive instruction in formulating research topics, conducting research, and writing papers which marshal support from secondary sources. They will also learn to read and understand research reports, to analyze and interpret results, and develop in-depth, research-based papers centering on topics in their academic disciplines.
Prerequisites: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of 60 hours of class work or more. ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and SPCH 1311

ENVR 1301 Environmental Science (3-0-3)
General interest study relating scientific knowledge to problems involving energy and the environment. Requires minimal science background.

GOVT 2305 U.S. Government (3-0-3)
A broad survey of the basic elements of American politics. Attention is given to the normative and Constitutional foundations of the political culture, the development of major government institution, political organizations and processes, and major policy outputs.

GOVT 2306 Texas Government (3-0-3)
Topics may include discussion for the Texas and U.S. constitution; the role of the state in the federal system; the diverse demographic, economic, and cultural bases of state politics; elections, interest groups, and elites; and legislative, executive, judicial, urban, and county politics.

HIST 1301 U.S. History I (3-0-3)
History of the United States to 1877. A chronological, thematic, and analytical study of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic history of the United States from colonial beginnings and early nationhood through the era of reconstruction.

HIST 1302 U.S. History II (3-0-3)
History of the United States from 1877 to the present. A chronological, thematic, and analytical study of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic history of the United States from the end of reconstruction to the present.

HIST 2301 The Religious History of the United States (3-0-0)
This course will address the United States religion from a historical perspective, examining various economic, social, and political forces in understanding how America came to be a land of such diverse religious beliefs.

MATH 1314 College Algebra (3-0-3)
Topics include algebraic expressions; equations; inequalities over the real numbers; relations, functions and graphs; polynomial and rational functions; systems of linear equations and inequalities; complex numbers; and matrices and determinants.

MATH 1324 Business Math (3-0-3)
An introduction to business math with an emphasis on the algebra of functions. Concentration is on the algebraic manipulations of functions and includes volume and profit functions, both linear and quadratic; root finding and graphical analysis; and matrices and determinants.

MATH 1332 Mathematics for Liberal Arts (3-0-3)
Study of modern algebra and geometry. Topics include sets, logic, number systems, number theory, functions, equivalence, congruence, measurement, other geometric concepts, and the introduction of probability and statistics.

MATH 1380 Elementary Statistical Methods (3-0-3) cross-listed with PSYC 2311: Statistics for Behavioral and Social Sciences
Presentation and interpretation of data, probability, sampling, correlation and regression, analysis of variance, and the use of statistical software.

MUSI 2300 Music Appreciation (3-0-3)
Survey of the standard repertory, from the Baroque period to the present, in its historical context. The purpose of the course is to develop listening skills and appreciation of music. The course is designed for students with no formal music training and little exposure to “classical” music.

PSYC 2301 Introduction to Psychology (3-0-3)
Survey of major topics in psychology. Introduction to the study of behavior and the factors that determine and affect behavior.

SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3)
An introductory survey including basic concepts in the field of sociology, the relationship of the individual to the cultures and to the groups present in contemporary society, and major social institutions.

SPCH 1311 Speech Communications (3-0-3)
Study of theories and practice of communication in personal, small groups, and public speech.

Biblical/Theological Studies: Bible

BIBL 1300 Introduction to the Bible (3-0-3)
Introduction to the events, personalities, themes, and content of the biblical text. The course seeks to familiarize students with the central elements of the literature, history, and religion of ancient Israel, the emergence of Judaism, and the literature and history of the first Christians.

BIBL 1301 Spiritual Formation (3-0-3)
Study of the biblical text on the nature of the Christian life, including personal discipleship, the development of spiritual disciplines, and consideration of spiritual battles a Christian will face in his or her spiritual pilgrimage.

BIBL 2300 Introduction to the Old Testament (3-0-3)
Survey of the Old Testament in its historical and cultural context to understand its general content, including the outstanding features and basic teachings, to discover the place of each book in God’s total, progressive revelation, and to apply practical principles for contemporary Christian living.

BIBL 2302 Introduction to the New Testament (3-0-3)
Survey of the New Testament in its historical and cultural context, including the
intertestamental period, to gain knowledge of the life of Christ, establishment of the church, and teachings concerning the believer’s faith and practice.

BIBL 2362 Festivals and Celebrations in the Biblical Text (3-0-3)
An analysis of the annual religious celebrations of ancient Judaism in their theological and cultural context. The course examines the background and characters of feasts, festivals, fasts, and Temple practices of the Old and New Testament texts. Students will develop an awareness of the connections between the agricultural calendar and annual celebrations whose theological context sought to maintain the connection between the individual, state, and God.

BIBL 3301 Exegesis of the Greek New Testament (3-0-3)
Continued study of the Greek New Testament, using select biblical passages to assist students in utilizing grammar, vocabulary, and other tools for making interpretive decisions.
Prerequisite: GREK 3304

BIBL 3302 Biblical Interpretation (3-0-3)
Introduction to the principles and processes of biblical interpretation and application, emphasizing both theory and practice. The student is introduced to the principles of general and special hermeneutics, and basic exegetical tools and methods.
Prerequisite: BIBL 1300, BIBL 2300, and BIBL 2302

BIBL 3303 The Pentateuch (3-0-3)
General interpretation of the first five books of the Bible according to their theological and historical content, major events, and unity and diversity. Special attention is given to critical issues of interpretation.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2300

BIBL 3304 The Historical Books (3-0-3)
General interpretation of the Deuteronomistic History (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) and the Chronistic History (Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah). Special attention is given to identifying the central theme of each book, and defining the spiritual example set by key biblical characters.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2300

BIBL 3305 The Prophets (3-0-3)
General interpretation of the message of the prophets within their historical and cultural contexts. Special attention is given to the theological content of the books, and the ministerial implications of the prophetic message for contemporary Christians.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2300

BIBL 3306 The Wisdom and Poetical Books (3-0-3)
Interpretation of the poetical books and wisdom books, including the Psalms, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Ruth, and Esther.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2300

BIBL 3321 & BIBL 3322 Faithwalking 1 and Faithwalking 2 (3-0-3)
These two courses prepare students for the ministry by challenging them to a life more fully committed to Jesus Christ. They are structured as both spiritual formation and personal development courses. The courses promote a better understanding of how students’ family systems affect their development as individuals and as ministers, and call students to work together with other Christians in a missional community that serves the marginalized. The courses combine classroom discussions, individualized coaching, and practice experiences in the community. The end product of the courses is the students’ commitment to a specific mission that will guide them in their present and future ministries.
Prerequisite: Faithwalking 1: 60 hours of study and approval by the teacher; Faithwalking 2: Faithwalking 1.

BIBL 4301 The Synoptic Gospels (3-0-3)
Study of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Major themes of the life and teachings of Christ are presented and compared.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2302

BIBL 4302 The Prison and Pastoral Epistles (3-0-3)
Study of the central message of Paul’s letters to the Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians, Titus, Philemon, and Timothy.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2302

BIBL 4303 Romans and Galatians (3-0-3)
Study of the doctrine of justification as presented in Romans and principles to help Christians with the trials of life as presented in Galatians.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2302

BIBL 4304 The Gospel of John (3-0-3)
Study of the message of the Gospel of John. Content and application to ministry and the spiritual life are emphasized.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2302

BIBL 4305 Revelation (3-0-3)
Study of the book of Revelation, including different theories of eschatological interpretation.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2302

BIBL 4306 The General Epistles (3-0-3)
Study of the epistles of Hebrews, James, Peter, John, and Jude, and an analysis of their theological and spiritual significance.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300 and BIBL 2302

BIBL 4310 Genesis in History, Theology, and Culture (3-0-3)
An integration of the biblical Book of Genesis within discussions of history, theology, and cultural interaction between the Church and Society. Utilizing careful academic research and writing methodologies, students will undertake in-depth hermeneutical and theological analysis of select portions of the Genesis text.
Prerequisite: BIBL 2300, BIBL 3302, THEO 3302, ENGL 1302

BIBL 4311 The Biblical Text and Non-Canonical Literature (3-0-3)
The course will include examination the content and literary development of the biblical canon in relation to extracanonical writings of the Apocrypha and Pseudipigrapha, Dead Sea Scrolls, the writings of Philo and Josephus, and the Septuagint and Aramaic Targums. Attention is given to the interpretation of the biblical text in the cultural environment of its origins.
Prerequisites: BIBL 2300, BIBL 2302, BIBL 3302

BIBL 4390-4394Special Topics: Biblical Studies (3-0-3)
A study of selected topics in the area of Biblical Studies. May be repeated for credit when topic changes with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of 60 hours of class work or more. BIBL 1300, BIBL 2300, BIBL 2302.

BIBL 4390 Special Topics: Biblical Reflection in Leadership from the Latina Perspective
BIBL 4391 Special Topics: Biblical Studies: Romans

BIBL 4395-4399 Independent Study: Biblical Studies (3-0-3)
An independent study of selected topics in conference with instructor and approved by the faculty. May be repeated for credit with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of at least 60 hours of coursework. BIBL 1300, 2300, 2302.

Biblical/Theological Studies: Theology

THEO 1300 Biblical Ethics (3-0-3)
Study of biblical ethics with a view towards dealing with contemporary ethical issues in relation to the Christian worldview, and application to the Hispanic context. Examples include abortion, euthanasia, divorce and remarriage, social justice, race relations, homosexuality, suicide, and cloning.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1301

THEO 2301 Christian Theology and Daily Life (3-0-3)
An examination of theological and faith issues that affect everyday life in Christian societies. A combination of biblical/theological readings and manifestations of culture, such as literature, art, and film, will provide the sources for this examination.

THEO 2302 Theology and Film (3-0-3)
An examination of theological and faith themes, motifs, and images through screenings of selected American and foreign films. Study of biographical materials of film writers and directors as well as film techniques will be incorporated in the content of the class as they pertain to the development of theological content in the film.

THEO 3301 Introduction to Theology (3-0-3)
Introduction to the study of theology, with emphasis given to the development of major historical periods in theology and their representatives, and the study of theological methods and sources.
Prerequisites: BIBL 1300, BIBL 2300 and BIBL 2302

THEO 3302 Systematic Theology (3-0-3)
Examination of the major Christian doctrines from a systematic perspective.
Prerequisite: THEO 3301

THEO 3303/MUSI 3303 Perspectives in Christian Worship (3-0-3)
Study of Christian worship from biblical times to the present. Students will have the opportunity to examine and reflect upon the historical, biblical and theological dimensions of worship; discuss the meaning and importance of the various elements of a worship service; and discuss the role of music in Christian worship.
This course is cross-referenced in the Bachelor of Arts in Music curriculum.

THEO 4310 Advanced Studies in Christian Doctrine (3-0-3)
Intensive study of selected Christian doctrines from a historical and interreligious dialogue perspective. Topic varies and will be announced prior to registration.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4311 Current Trends in Theology (3-0-3)
Historical and theological examination of key concerns, issues, and topics that have shaped contemporary theology.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4312 Hispanic Theology (3-0-3)
Examination of the development of Hispanic theology and the dynamics of theology from a Hispanic perspective. Attention is given to the contributions of major Hispanic theologians and to key themes, concerns, and methods of this particular theology.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4313 Readings in Major Christian Theologians (3-0-3)
Examination of the theological writings and contributions of major Christian theologians such as Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Karl Barth, and Paul Tillich.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4314 Latin American Christology (3-0-3)
Historical examination of the development of Latin American Christology from the Spanish Christology understandings to the contemporary Latin American contributions to the doctrine. Special effort is made to evaluate these contributions from an evangelical and
biblical perspective.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4315 Confronting Suffering from a Hispanic Perspective (3-0-3)
A critical theological examination of social suffering from a Hispanic perspective. The class will study theological and historical trends that have shaped traditional oppressive understandings of suffering among the Hispanic community. Also, it will explore theological, biblical, ethical, and practical foundations to confront this suffering in their churches and
communities.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4316 The Bible and Women (3-0-3)
An examination of cultural issues that have affected the reading of the Bible yesterday and today, as well as an analysis of traditional historical theological positions about women. Consideration will be given to female characters in the Bible and in the culture that have determined, in one way or another, what is to be a woman today. Also, the class will explore alternative Christian/Biblical perspectives that present more inclusive and holistic views about women.
Prerequisites: THEO 3301 and THEO 3302

THEO 4390-4395 Special Topics: Theology (3-0-3)
A study of selected topics in the area of theology. May be repeated for credit when topic changes with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of 60 hours of class work or more. THEO 3301, and THEO 3302.

THEO 4390 Special Topics: Leadership from a Latina Theological Perspective

THEO 4391 Special Topic: Christology (3-0-3)
This seminar will provide the student with a more complete and deep knowledge of the doctrine of Christ. The class will study in a critical way the historical development of the doctrine of Christ, and some of its contemporary expressions (context, theological method, and main issues). Also, it will reflect on the implications of this doctrine for an interreligious dialogue as well as for practical ministry.

THEO 4392 Special Topic: Christian Ethics in the Workplace (3-0-3)
The purpose of this course is to explore the application of a Christian way of thinking about workplace values and ethics. The course will critically examine a plethora of workplace topics and issues, understanding the most important aspects of their contemporary lived reality. For each topic, in each arena, we will explore the values and ethical insights which should be discussed and analyzed, and brought to bear from a biblical Christian framework. The course is designed to focus on three primary application areas: first, how does the biblical Christian framework shape our own personal work, calling, profession, and career; second, what does this mean for church leadership, structures, practices, and ethical education efforts; third, what does this mean for organizations where we work and have influence

THEO 4395-4399 Independent Study: Theology (3-0-3)
An independent study of selected topics in conference with instructor and approved by the faculty. May be repeated for credit with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of at least 60 hours of coursework. THEO 3301, and THEO 3302.

Biblical/Theological Studies: Biblical Languages

HEBR 3304 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew (3-0-3)
Introduction course that lays a foundation for the understanding of biblical Hebrew to assist students in the understanding of why translations of the Bible differ, the underlying meaning of biblical vocabulary, the basis of good exegesis, and the proper use of commentaries and other interpretative tools.

GREK 3304 Introduction to Biblical Greek (3-0-3)
Introduction to the language of the New Testament, laying a foundation for the under-standing of biblical Greek to assist students in the understanding of why translations of the Bible differ, the underlying meaning of biblical vocabulary, the basis of good exegesis, and the proper use of commentaries and other interpretative tools.

GREK 3305 Advanced Exegesis of the Greek New Testament (3-0-3)
In-depth analysis of the content and theological themes, and exegetical significance of the New Testament Gospel and Epistles through an examination of the grammatical and literary structure of the Greek New Testament.
Prerequisite: GREK 3304, and BIBL 3301

Biblical/Theological Studies: Church History

CHIS 3303 Church History I (3-0-3)
Introduction to church history through 1500 that focuses upon the history and development of the Kingdom of God movement. Special attention will be given to early vision and expansion of the church, followed by the impact that Constantine and the emergence of the Imperial Church in the fourth century had upon this early vision, and then the subsequent reforming efforts that were unleashed in reaction to the Imperial Church through 1500.

CHIS 4302 Church History II (3-0-3)
Introduction to Baptist Heritage by placing Baptists within the larger Protestant reformation beginning in the 1500s and subsequent reforming efforts in the broader Christian community to the present. Special attention will be given to Baptist origins, major Baptists distinctive, and reform movements that have shaped Baptists.
Prerequisite: CHIS 3303

CHIS 4310 Early Church History (3-0-3)
An in-depth study of the development of the Christian Church across its first six centuries, including the Ante- and Post-Nicene Fathers. Major attention is devoted to development of doctrine, especially Trinitarian and Christological formulations, developing ecclesiological structures, and the formation of the New Testament canon. Special attention given to the first four ecumenical church councils. Prerequisites: CHIS 3303, and CHIS 4302 or professor’s approval

Biblical/Theological Studies: Cross-Cultural & Religious Studies

RELI 2300 Christian Missions (3-0-3)
Study of missiological principles appropriate for the 21st century. Students will discover the spiritual, historical, strategic, social, and human dimensions of God’s activity in redemptive history through the local-global church.
Prerequisite: RELI 2351

RELI 2351 Culture and Religion (3-0-3)
Study of key concepts, methods, and theory in the study of cultural diversity, social institu-tions, linguistics, and cultural change among people of the world.

RELI 2352 Magic, Ritual and Religion (3-0-3)
An examination from the Christian perspective of magic and religion in cultures of the world with an emphasis on recent works dealing with mysticism and the occult.
Prerequisite: RELI 2351

RELI 2360 Archaeology and the Bible (3-0-3)
A survey of the archaeology of biblical lands. The course traces the development and methodology of modern archaeological research, and examines relevant sites and discoveries beginning in the prehistoric Near East and through the Late Roman periods. Special attention is given to the application and impact of archaeological research on the study and interpretation of the Bible and related literature.

RELI 3300 Worldviews and Faith (3-0-3)
A survey of major worldviews as they relate to understanding other faith expressions and being able to build bridges of understanding to these and other faith expressions.

RELI 3301 World Religions (3-0-3)
An introduction to the study of religion through examination of the significant themes, sacred texts, and practices of the world’s major religious traditions. The course explores the history, worldviews, forms, and ethical dimensions of Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, Taoist, Zoroastrian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions. The rise of modern sects and cults is also addressed.

RELI 3302 Religion in World Literature (3-0-3)
This class will examine how writers’ attitudes toward religion—pro, negative or ambivalent—affects their creative output. It will also allow students to examine their own spiritual foundations and how they might be expressed in creative writing. Toward that end students will sample poetry, drama and fiction by writers who reference spiritual belief systems. The primary focus is on Christianity but the readings include writers influenced by Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and traditional religions. Students are expected to engage the assignments—not just read them but to seek to know them critically—and be able to participate in class discussion and to write well-thought out and researched reaction papers. This class is not about memorizing facts and relying solely on other people’s opinions. It is about thinking independently, based on critical evaluation and learning to connect-the-literary-dots across a wide spectrum of creative writing.

RELI 3303 Special Topic in CC Studies: Understanding Islam (3-0-3)
This course will examine the history and development of Islam, the beliefs, practices, and worldview of Muslims, and the importance of culture in understanding and interacting with Muslims. In addition, students will analyze and evaluate Mohammad, the Quran, and the truth claims of Islam. Finally, students will consider various methods of ministry to Muslims, and develop both personal and church strategies for evangelizing the Muslim world.

RELI 3304 Special Topic in CC Studies: Islamic History (3-0-3)
This course explores the life of Muhammad from the earliest biographical sources, together with an overview of Islamic history from its earliest days to the twenty-first century.

RELI 3305 Missions in Latin America (3-0-3)
Course will concentrate on the establishment and growth of evangelical Christianity in Latin America through historical developments, key individual leaders, and the various strategies employed, current situation and future prospects.
Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 hours of coursework completed including CMNS 2300 and RELI 2351 or RELI 2352

RELI 3306 Missions: Persecution Today and its Relationship to Witness and Church Planting (3-0-3)
This course pays special attention to the implications that persecution has for witness and church planting in resistant areas of the world. Much of the course content depends on original field research by the Persecution Task Force on Global Persecution sponsored by the International Mission Board, SBC and led by the class professor. This research is based on approximately 500 interviews within 72 countries of those who have experienced persecution first-hand in many challenging environments around the world historically as well as in modern times.

Foundation Studies

FOUN 1101 Foundation Class (3-0-3)
This course is a study of academic reading and study skills that can be applied in any college or university educational setting. It integrates the study and critical thinking skills needed to achieve success at the college level. It includes a study in learning styles, time management, setting goals, understanding learning, taking notes, active reading skills, critical thinking, expanding vocabulary, and preparing and taking exams. Students use assessment instruments and assignments to identify their own strengths and weaknesses as strategic learners.

FOUN 1102 Fundamentals of Academic Research (1-0-1)
This course will give students the skills needed to be able to do academic research (including online research) in order to succeed in college.

FOUN 2101 Capstone (AA Capstone) (1-0-1)
Seminar is taken in the last semester of the Associate of Arts program. The seminar provides a learning experience that integrates what the student has learned in General Studies, Cross-Cultural Studies, and Biblical/Theological Studies.

FOUN 4101 Capstone (BA Capstone) (1-0-1)
Seminar is taken in the final year of study. The seminar provides a learning experience that integrates the major field of study, biblical/theological studies, cross-cultural religious studies, general studies, and concentration studies by examining topics related to ministry leadership. Capstone students consider their learning in the context of the mission and goals proposed by BUA and in the context of their personal and professional goals. Preparation of a portfolio benchmarks what has been accomplished by the student since the beginning of the higher education experience.

Concentration Area of Study: Practical Theology

REDU 1300 Bible Study Methods (3-0-3)
An introduction to the study of the Bible in the local church setting with an emphasis on the development of practical insights and skills for the leader or Bible teacher of small groups, devotional, or gatherings. Course content includes basic background material of the Old and New Testament worlds, simple hermeneutical skills, and approaches to the study and discussion of contemporary application of the biblical text to the modern world context.

REDU 1301 Principles of Teaching and Learning (3-0-3)
Study of instructional methods and resources that can be used in a church setting or other teaching environment. This course will prepare students for the teaching ministry.

REDU 2300 Multicultural Education (3-0-3)
Examination of an educational strategy that approaches the classroom as a place to create equal educational opportunities for students from diverse racial, ethnic, social-class, and cultural groups. Students will learn how to affirm differences and realize similarities in the students they teach.

REDU 3301 Early Childhood Education (3-0-3)
Examination of the theories of child development, developmental sequences, and factors that influence children’s development, from birth through preschool. Students will consider the planning, implementing, and evaluating of developmentally appropriate activities for preschoolers in the creative areas of art, music, movement, and play, including experiences and methods for developing self-expression and creativity.

EDUC 4301 Principles and Methods for Developmental Reading Instruction (3-0-3)
This course represents an overview of the development of reading across the grades. The book study focuses on the reading process, techniques for developing oral and written language facility, word identification and comprehension of readers from various socio-cultural backgrounds and with different abilities, and classroom assessment of reading.

EDUC 4302 Foundations in Bilingual Education (3-0-3)
The purpose of this book study is to introduce the field of Bilingual Education, including the history thereof, legal issues, language acquisition theories and methods. These areas will be covered in depth. The information provided will enable students to have an understanding of trends and issues in Bilingual Education, service delivery models, their role as bilingual educators, and planning for dual language instruction. Students will also be provided with practical knowledge related to English instruction and how to best service (elementary and secondary) students in an additive bilingual environment.

PCC 2300 Cross-Cultural Conflict Transformation (3-0-3) (Cross-listed as LEAD 2305)
Study of conflict and biblically-based methods that may be employed to transform conflicting inner-personal and communal relationships into healthier relationships. Course discussion includes cross-cultural barriers in conflict mediation and non-western approaches to conflict transformation.

PCC 2322 Skills in Working with People across Cultures (3-0-3)
Knowledge, values, and skills in the helping process in multicultural settings. Supplemented by three hours per week of supervised field work experience.

YMIN 3300 Strategies for Youth Ministry (3-0-3)
Study of strategies for ministry to youth, especially in a multicultural context.

YMIN 3301 Understanding Youth (3-0-3)
This course examines the physical, mental, social, personality and spiritual development of adolescents with the goal of understanding youth to minister to them.

YMIN 4300 Youth Leadership Development (3-0-3)
Study of strategies to identify and develop emerging leaders in the youth ministry of the local church.

YMIN 4301 Issues in Contemporary Youth Culture (3-0-3)
Survey of contemporary issues in youth culture and their application to ministry in a local church in a predominantly Hispanic context.

YMIN 4302 Youth Ministry Practicum (3-0-3)
The purpose of this course is to provide a church leadership experience through an internship program. This course is designed as an in-depth practical ministerial experience. The student will be guided by a ministerial staff member at the host church and will report regularly to a BUA faculty member. The student will participate in a number of ministry experiences. The course will be for a minimum of 10 weeks.

PMIN 3300 Church Ministries (3-0-3)
Study of personal preparation for ministry and the leadership roles of the minister in the local church. Emphasis is given to practical experiential learning and contextual application to a predominantly Hispanic ministry setting.

PMIN 3301 Preaching (3-0-3)
Study of the theological foundations of preaching, sermon structure, sermon development, and sermon delivery, with emphasis on the Hispanic context.
Prerequisite: BIBL 1300, BIBL 2300, BIBL 2302, BIBL 3302

PMIN 3303 Media and Ministry (3-0-3)
Teaches competency in basic communication skills in clearly presenting key messages to both internal and external publics. Primary emphasis is on enhancing writing skills. Fundamentals of public relations, photography, graphic design and relevant computer skills also are covered. Students will complete individual and group projects.
Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 hours of coursework completed, including ENG 1301, ENG 1302 and SPCH 1311 or professor approval.

PMIN 3390 Special Topic in Pastoral Ministries: Congregational Leadership (3-0-3)
Congregational Leadership is a course that teaches the student on the theological, cultural, and practical applications of leadership of the local church from a Hispanic perspective. This course is designed to help pastors, associate pastors, church staff and church leaders to further their education in leading a local congregation.

PMIN 4300 Church Growth: Leading Organizational Change (3-0-3)
The purpose of the course is to teach students the leader’s role on how to bring about change to an organization. The context of this course is primarily in church and non-profit organizations. The students will also learn how to collaborate as a team to diagnose the health of an organization, to analyze the problems of the organization to bring about corrective changes, and to make a professional consultation presentation.

PMIN 4301 Pastoral Ministry (3-0-3)
Study of personal preparation for ministry and the leadership roles of the minister in the local church. Emphasis is given to practical experiential learning and contextual application to a predominantly Hispanic ministry setting.

PMIN 4302 Skills in Church Administration (3-0-3)
This course addresses the tasks and responsibilities of the chief administrator of the church or a non-profit organization. This course teaches practical skills for the administrator. Emphasis will be given to the practical experiential learning and contextual application.

CHPL 3300 Biblical and Historical Models of Church Planting (3-0-3)
Study of the models for church planting taken from the biblical text. Emphasis is given to principles taken from the Gospels and the Book of Acts. Models of contextualized church planting in the history of missions are provided.

CHPL 4300 Contextual Church Planting (3-0-3)
Study of the theology and practice of planting churches from a scriptural perspective. Studies include an overview of the church planting process and strategies for reaching communities with a contextual pattern.

PCC 3300: Introduction to Pastoral Care (3-0-3)
The course engages students in the practical aspects of offering pastoral care in various ministerial, cultural and family contexts: Students practice listening, prayer, conflict mediation and pastoral theological reflection; students apply narrative theology, brief pastoral counseling, and Biblical themes to pastoral caregiving; and students learn skills of non-anxious care in crisis situations.

PCC 3301: Pastoral Care in the Church (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to Pastoral Care with an emphasis on clinical learning. Students will begin surveying the history of the pastoral care movement and comparing the past with the present as well as viewing the projected future. Interchangeably, the student will experience pastoral care via his/her clinical field assignment. The student’s clinical learning will be extracted by a series of developmental and cognitive methodologies to include: confidential verbatim reports, case studies, theological integration papers, genealogy surveys, short stories of personal experiences and events, reading reports, as well as an evaluating process of the student’s progress via supervision/mentorship sessions with professor, field supervisor, and peer supervision. In combination of the student’s clinical work/evaluation and a thorough reading of the assigned textbooks the student will be given the chance to bring an assessment of self and his/her ministry in regards to the dynamics and approaches that the discipline of pastoral care provides.
Prerequisite: PCC 3300 (three credit hours)

PCC 4190 Special Topic: Mental Health & Pastoral Care in the Hispanic Community (1-0-1)
This course will explore the intersections of modern psychiatry and ecumenical Christian spirituality. Lectures will draw from the writings of theologians, and each lesson will be illustrated with material inspired by real psychiatric cases. Aspiring hospital chaplains, Christian-oriented health care professionals, and Christian ministers who expect to work in mainly Hispanic communities will find this course particularly helpful.

PCC 4390 Special Topic in Clinical Pastoral Care (3-0-3)
This course offers an in-depth exploration of themes and practices in pastoral care. The course is designed to facilitate a reflection upon the challenges ministers face in different pastoral care settings.

PCC 4900 Clinical Pastoral Education (9-0-9)
Before taking PCC 4900 it is preferred that students take PCC-I 3300 and PCC-II 3301 as your prerequisite. Clinical Pastoral Education will be taken at a (non-church site) CPE Center accredited through either the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) or through the College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychotherapy, Inc. (CPSP). Each CPE course is worth nine credit academic hours and worth one unit (400 hours) of CPE. Students may choose a center from a broad range of institutional settings. However, each CPE unit is subject to acceptance by the CPE center via interview by a CPE supervisor and CPE faculty chaplains. The following CPE Centers are located within healthcare, military, counseling centers, and other institutional settings in the San Antonio area and the Southwest Texas Region:

CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital System, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 704-2011,; Brooke Army Medical Center CPE Center, MCHE PC Bldg 3600/DMPC-CPE, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr., San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 916-1105; Ecumenical Center for Religion and Health 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr., San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 616-0885; Methodist Healthcare System Pastoral Care Services, 7711 Louis Pasteur, Suite 101, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 575-6834; South Texas Veterans HealthCare System Audie L. Murphy Division, 7400 Merton Minter St, Chaplain Service, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 699-2130; Wilford Hall Medical Center, Chaplain Services, 2200 Bergquist Dr., Suite 1, CPE Program, 59th Medical Wing/HC, Lackland A F B, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 292-7373; Baptist Health System Department of Pastoral Care, 111 Dallas St., San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 297-7750; Valley Baptist Health System Clinical Pastoral Education Center, Benwood Dr., Harlingen, TX Phone: (956) 389-6750; Driscoll Children’s Hospital, 3533 South Alameda St., Corpus Christi, TX Phone: (361) 694-4504.
In accordance with ACPE and CPSP, CPE hours are divided into two parts: One hundred classroom hours and three hundred clinical hours. Each unit is worth 400 hours. One to four consecutive accredited CPE units can be counted towards credentials to be a professional chaplain, pastoral care practitioner, and board certified chaplain or as an ecclesiastical ordination/endorsement requirement by a denomination.

Prerequisite: PCC 3300 and PCC 3301

PRTH 2300 Theology of Christian Service (3-0-3)
An introduction to the theology of ministry that involves every Christian. The course addresses a biblical understanding of the Church, the doctrine of the priesthood of the believer, and an exploration of every believer’s calling to and equipping for ministry. Special topics considered include ordination, the dichotomy between pastor and laity, and the variety of issues relevant to lay and vocational ministry.

PRTH 2301 Knowing the Will of God (3-0-3)
The course examines multiple biblical models in seeking divine guidance, a common question asked throughout history. Historical, contemporary, and emergent approaches to the topic are considered as students are led to develop their own theological positions on divine guidance.

PRTH 4303 Special Topics: Practical Theology (3-0-3)
A study of selected topics in the area of Practical Theology. May be repeated for credit with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of 60 hours of class work or more. Registration for this course allowed only if the topic is not offered as a regularly scheduled course during that semester.

PRTH 4305 Special Topic: The Scriptures of Islam (3-0-3)
This course provides an in-depth examination of the Quran and its exegesis, as well as the science of Hadith studies.

PRTH 4306 Introduction to the Qur’an (3-0-3)
In this course we will examine the Qur’an in a general way and consider a number of issues concerning it, including the revelatory process, the circumstances surrounding the revelation of various verses, collection of its parts, development of the Arabic script and its implications for the Qur’an, commentaries, themes, source material for the text of the Qur’an, claims of inimitability for the Qur’an, and a number of theological questions within Islam related to the Qur’an.

Concentration Area of Study: Social Work

SWO 2301 Ministry and Community (3-0-3)
Students will explore ways ministry outside the walls of the church can take place in mobilizing the church to connect effectively, assess its resources, & meet the needs of the community. The strength based model will serve as a foundational basis in assisting students equip the local church. An introduction of the systems approach will be presented to help the local church join Christian and secular organizations, and communities in dealing with social, economic, and practical. issues and advocate for justice. A 20-hour service learning project (lab) will assist the student in contextualization/practice of the course content.

SWO 2321 Introduction to Social Work (3-0-3)
An introduction to the discipline of social work and the institution of social welfare. Emphasis is on common human needs and problems, and the development and functioning of social welfare as an institution of society. A 25-hour service learning project (lab) will assist the student in contextualization/practice of the course content.

PCC 2322 Skills in Working with People across Cultures (3-0-3)
Knowledge, values, and skills in the helping process in multicultural settings. Supplemented by three hours per week of supervised field work experience.

SWO 3351 Human Behavior and the Environment (3-0-3)
Human development across the life course with emphasis on the effects of the social and physical environment on maturation. Special attention given to gender issues, cross-cultural and racial issues, and other special populations.

SWO 3371 Social Work Practice I (3-0-3)
The generalist model of social work practice, including theoretical frameworks, problem solving method, values and ethics, and practices with special populations. Thirty-five hours of service learning work desired.

Business Studies

ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting (3-0-3)
An introduction to business external financial reporting designed to create an awareness of the accounting concepts and principles used in preparing the three basic financial statements: the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flow. The course is designed for all business students, whether future users or preparers of accounting information.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, and MATH 1324

BUSI 1301 Introduction to Business (3-0-3)
An introductory survey of American business, in which students examine and gain an understanding of the various types of business organization. Also discussed is the nature and form of long- and short-term financing and the selection and motivation of personnel. In addition, the management and marketing functions will be discussed. The course emphasizes business ethics, accounting concepts, quality management, investments, and successful entrepreneurship. The Small Business Administration is analyzed concerning personal entrepreneurship.

BUSI 2301 Business Information Systems and Processing (3-0-3)
An introduction to understanding the role of computers in business. Students acquire computer skills needed effectively to create and maintain data and to convert them into effective information. Students also learn how to utilize different software applications as part of the Microsoft 2007 suite and manage their computers, maintaining the operating system (Microsoft Windows XP Pro).
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301

BUSI 2311 Business Project Management (3-0-3)
A study of building a basic project plan; learning to establish and identify resources, assign tasks, refine a project plan, establish budgets; and reporting. Students explore the fundamentals of tracking a project plan, managing multiple projects, and integrating various software applications and their roles and how they affect the outcome of a project.
Prerequisite: BUSI 2301

BUSI 3301 Business Law (3-0-3)
Legal analysis of contemporary environment of business law including the common law, legal reasoning, court systems and procedures, constitutional law, torts, contracts and corresponding areas of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code, agency, property, bailment, international law, and related jurisprudential topics in light of social, ethical, political, economic, and global perspectives.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301

BUSI 4301 Entrepreneurial Process (3-0-3)
The course explores the development of innovative thinking and venture exploration. Students prepare a business plan for an actual venture, business or nonprofit, which may implemented in the future. Drafts of the plan and oral presentations of various sections are submitted and presented during the course. Topics are introduced through the use of creative exercises, team projects, concept identification, and the discussion of entrepreneurship cases.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, BUSI 2311, MATH 1324, ECON 2325, and MGMT 3305

BUSI 4302 International Business (3-0-3)
This course is a broad survey of the field of international business and provides the foundation for further specialization in this field. It begins with a brief overview of international business, focused on the concept of globalization. The course will then examine the environment for international firms, particularly the cultural, political, social, economic, technological and other configurations that support cross-border trade and investment. Amongst others, we will look at the role of national policies, cultures and business systems, the evolution of international markets in goods, services and finance, and the mechanisms and infrastructures for trade, investment and finance. The course will then probe international firms: their strategies and organizational design, their entry modes into international enterprise, and their behavioral and control systems. Furthermore, this course provides students the opportunity to explore the international business environment and understand internationalization strategies, modes of entry and the operational decisions facing managers of companies that operate beyond their domestic market.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, BUSI 2311, ECON 2325, ECON 2326, LEAD 2301, MATH 1324, MGMT 3305 and MRKT 3301.

ECON 2325 Microeconomics (3-0-3)
An introduction to the economic theory of decision making by consumers and business firms, an analysis of the domestic and international market systems and their roles in allocating goods and services, and problems of market failure.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301 and MATH 1324

ECON 2326 Macroeconomics (3-0-3)
Economic analysis at the national level, including the determination of aggregate income and employment, operation of the domestic and international monetary systems, short-term income fluctuations, and long-term economic growth.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301 and MATH 1324

FINA 3301 Principles of Finance (3-0-3)
Introduction to financial management techniques. Topics may include time value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk and return, capital budgeting analysis, financing alternatives, financial planning, ratio analysis, short-term financial decisions, working capital, sources and uses of funds, capital structure, dividend policy, lease analysis, options, international financial management, and other topics associated with successful business finance decisions in an internationally competitive environment.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, BUSI 2311 and MATH 1324

MGMT 3301 Principles of Management (3-0-3)
A study of the complex role managers play in creating and maintaining organizations. Organization theory and behavior are explored within the context of changing technological, social, and political/legal environments and the internationalization of the economy. The course also offers introduction to strategic analysis, planning and decision making.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, BUSI 2311 and MATH 1324

MRKT 3301 Principles of Marketing (3-0-3)
Introduction to basic principles of marketing. An examination of market analysis methods and their use to develop the organization’s product mix and the integration of the communication, distribution, and pricing strategies to achieve goals.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, BUSI 2311, and MATH 1324

MGMT 4302 Human Resource Management (3-0-3)
Analysis of how organizations attract, motivate, develop, and retain employees, and how they interact with organizations representing employees. Designed to provide students with an opportunity to understand the functional areas of human resource management and the integration of these functions into an effective and efficient human resource management system.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301, BUSI 2301, BUSI 2311, LEAD 3301, MATH 1324, and MGMT 3301

Leadership Studies

LEAD 1300 Personal Dimensions of Leadership (3-0-3)
Examination of the major personal dynamics that affect the life of the leader, such as: spiritual, physical, and emotional health; balance between personal life and career; conflict resolution; money management; and healthy relationships with the other. Emphasis is given to the relationship between the leader and self, family, and the world.

LEAD 2301 Cross-Cultural Communication (3-0-3)
Exploration of skills necessary for effective communication in a wide variety of settings including business, community, education, and non-profit organizations, both public and private. Students examine cross-cultural communication skills such as writing, interviewing, listening, feedback, conflict transformation, and problem solving; and consider value orientations in order to communicate effectively cross-culturally.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302

LEAD 2305 Cross-Cultural Conflict Transformation (3-0-3) (Cross-listed as PCC 2305)
Study of conflict and biblically-based methods that may be employed to transform conflicting inner-personal and communal relationships into healthier relationships. Course discussion includes cross-cultural barriers in conflict mediation and non-western approaches to conflict transformation.

LEAD 3301 Survey of Leadership Models (3-0-3)
Survey of leadership theory, ethics, values, character development, diversity, and leadership behavior in each model with an emphasis on developing the requisite skills for effective servant leadership.
Prerequisite: BUSI 1301, LEAD 1300, and LEAD 2301

LEAD 3302 Cross-Cultural Leadership Development (3-0-3)
This course will deal with the understanding of the development of a leader, the role
of a leader as a team member, the role of leading an organization and issues of
leadership navigating across cultures.

LEAD 4301 Global Leadership and Cross-Cultural Issues (3-0-3)
Explores issues associated with the impact of leadership upon global communities. Students apply knowledge regarding global and social systems as they have related historically to leadership. Identifying and differentiating between the several approaches to systems-thinking and change help draw implications for leadership within varied cultures and the relationship between, and problems associated with, global systems and technology.
Prerequisites: BUSI 1301, LEAD 2301 and LEAD 3301

LEAD 4311 Leadership of the Non-Profit Organization (3-0-3)
Analysis of administrative structure, decision making, and program delivery for nonprofit organizations. Includes management of agency operations in areas of leadership, strategic planning, staffing, personnel selection and policies, volunteers, boards, and community relations.

LEAD 4312 Servant Leadership (3-0-3)
Intensive study of one paradigm of leadership, that of servant-leader, within the context of a Christian worldview. Students examine writings and models of servant-leaders, both historically and modern-day; explore current developments within the field of study; research avenues of exemplifying servant leadership in a cross-cultural environment; and participate in a service-oriented project.
Prerequisites: LEAD 2301 and LEAD 3301

LEAD 4321 Ethical Decision Making for Leadership (3-0-3)
Examination of the ethical dilemmas of leadership and the moral implications of decision making in the context of a Christ-centered life. Ethical theories and principles of decision making are explored as well as theories related to leadership in public and private organizations. Students develop their own ethical perspectives that will inform their own decision making in the context of their chosen professions as they work to become good members of society, moral leaders in the home and the market place, and maturing Christian leaders.

LEAD 4390-4394Special Topics in Leadership (3-0-3)
Covers special topics related to leadership and/or organization studies, subject to emerging student and/or employer demands. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit provided course content is different.

LEAD 4390 Special Topics: Nurturing Women Leaders from a Latina Perspective

LEAD 4395-4399 Independent Study: Cross-Cultural Leadership (3-0-3)
An independent study of selected topics in conference with instructor and approved by the faculty. May be repeated for credit with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member. GPA of
3.3 or higher and completion of at least 60 hours of coursework.

LEAD 4199 Internship
Students are required to participate in a supervised practice experience in their area of study. A student must complete 60 hours of coursework to qualify for the internship requirement. The required internship may be taken either during a summer or a semester-long experience.

Human Behavior Studies

PSYC 2301: Introduction to Psychology (3-0-3)
Survey of major topics in psychology. Introduction to the study of behavior and the factors that determine and affect behavior.

PSYC 2302: Neurosciences (3-0-3)
An introduction to the biological bases of human and animal behavior. Emphasis is placed upon neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and behavioral methodologies which contribute to an understanding of brain-behavior relationships.

PSYC 2311: Statistics for Behavioral and Social Sciences (3-0-3) Cross-listed with MATH 1380 Elementary Statistical Methods
An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics for social science majors. Development of skills in research data analysis.

PSYC 2321: Human Development (3-0-3)
A survey of the field of developmental psychology. Consideration is given to the development of human behavior from conception to death.

PSYC 2331: Theories of Learning (3-0-3)
An examination of major theories about the nature of the learning process. Discussion will focus on the construction and evaluation of models of learning. The practical and theoretical implications of research results for the acquisition, maintenance, modification, and elimination of behavior will be considered. Related memory phenomena and theories may be discussed.

PSYC 2351: Cross-Cultural Psychology (3-0-3)
An examination of the role of culture in the development and validation of psychological theories. Critical discussion of the application of theories of human behavior developed in the United States and Western Europe to other cultural groups, including ethnic minority subgroups. Topics may include identity formation, cognitive and personality development, social and organizational behavior, intergroup relations, psychological assessment, and mental health.

PSYC 3341: Theories of Personality (3-0-3)
Problems, methods, major theories, and results in the study of development and maintenance of typical modes of behavior and dynamics of adjustment.

PSYC 3342: Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy (3-0-3)
Provides introduction and practice in the basic intervention strategies and techniques used in counseling and the human service professions.

PSYC 3361: Social Psychology (3-0-3)
Causes and the effects of human interaction. The importance of others in determining one’s perception, attitudes, motivation, pattern of communication, and behavior-such as altruism, affiliation, aggression, conformity, and achievement is examined.

PSYC 4341: Abnormal Psychology (3-0-3)
An introduction to historical and modern views of abnormal behavior and a survey of the field of psychological disorders.

PSYC 4390: Special Topics in Psychology (3-0-3)
This course explores new course offerings in any area of psychology. Topics are listed in the registration book. Descriptions of specific topics are posted in the psychology department. Specific requirements will depend on topic.

SOCI 1301: Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3)
An introductory survey including basic concepts in the field of sociology, the relationship of the individual to the cultures and to the groups present in contemporary society, and major social institutions.

SOCI 2301: Social Problems (3-0-3)
An analysis of current social problems with emphasis on sociological aspects of problems in education, family life, religion, and other social institutions.

SOCI 2302: Social Stratification (3-0-3)
Examines theory and research pertaining to inequalities of power, prestige, and economic privilege. Major emphasis upon inequality and social mobility in the United States.

SOCI 2312: Research Methods for Behavioral and Social Sciences (3-0-3)
Introduction to the philosophy of science and the logic of research design. Examines a variety of social research designs including experiments, survey research, content analysis, and historical analysis. Course emphasizes techniques related to information gathering, basic data analysis, and reporting findings.

SOCI 2321: Sociological Foundations (3-0-3)
This course provides a foundation of social structures.

SOCI 3301: Classical Sociological Theory (3-0-3)
Examines the transition from social philosophy to sociology, with special emphasis on the work of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim and Max Weber. The foundational theories and concepts in sociology are addressed, with attention also given to the application of theory to longstanding and current social issues.

SOCI 3321: Contemporary Sociological Theory (3-0-3)
Examines contemporary paradigms in sociological theory (e.g., functionalism, neo-Marxism, phenomenology, and feminism), and current debates over the state of theory. Attention is also given to the linkages between theory and research.

SOCI 3342: Race and Ethnic Relations (3-0-3)
Examines the dominant-subordinate relations in world societies, with major emphasis on the United States. Models of assimilation, colonial and class society, and consequences for minority and majority populations may be examined.

SOCI 3362: Urban Sociology (3-0-3)
The discipline of sociology arose, in large part, as a response to the rapid urbanization and industrialization of society. This course will begin with a brief history of urbanization, followed by consideration of central theories of urban sociology including ecological, political/economic, cultural, and experiential viewpoints. Next, we will examine more recent research to explore how individuals, social interactions, and institutions shape – and are shaped by – characteristics of urban space. We will address topics such as urban poverty, race and ethnicity, residential segregation, housing, neighborhood context, crime and victimization, health, social isolation, culture, and global cities.

SOCI 4341: Migration Dynamics (3-0-3)
This course considers the social policy and social welfare concerns associated with contemporary migration. This exploration is grounded in a focus on the economic causes and consequences of migration; public policy regarding migration, the rights of immigrants; and the roles of governmental and nongovernmental local, national and international organizations.

SOCI 4390: Special Topics in Sociology (3-0-3)
Course for students who wish to study with a professor in an area of sociology not covered
by regular course offerings. Students will contract with professor regarding study and number of semester hours.

GERI 2301: Introduction to Gerontology (3-0-3)
An examination of aging in relation to sociology, psychology, biology, law, political science, literature, religion, recreation, and health. Special emphasis is placed on seeking ways to improve the quality of life for persons over thirty-five.

GERI 3321: Aging and Ethnicity (3-0-3); cross-listed as SWO 4390 as Special Topic in Social Work: Aging and Ethnicity
Impact of ethnicity as an explanatory variable in understanding the nature of the aging process. Special consideration is given to how ethnicity shapes the nature of health and human service policy and delivery in behalf of older persons.

GERI 3341: Social Services for Older Persons (3-0-3)
Federal and state laws which affect older persons, particularly in the areas of employment, retirement, health, and housing. The major legal problems of the elderly and needed advocacy programs for the aged are given special attention.

GERI 4301: Sociology of Aging (3-0-3)
Impact of aging upon individuals and society, as well as the reactions of individuals and
society to aging. Social gerontology is the principal focus of attention of the course.

GERI 4390: Aging and Mental Health (3-0-3)
Mental health needs and related problems of aging individuals with considerable discussion of approved mental health treatments for such persons.

PCC 2300/LEAD 2305: Cross-Cultural Conflict Transformation (3-0-3)
Study of conflict and biblically-based methods that may be employed to transform conflicting inner-personal and communal relationships into healthier relationships. Course discussion includes cross-cultural barriers in conflict mediation and non-western approaches to conflict transformation.

PCC 2322: Skills in Working with People across Cultures (3-0-3)
Knowledge, values, and skills in the helping process in multicultural settings. Supplemented by three hours per week of supervised field work experience.

PCC 3300: Introduction to Pastoral Care (3-0-3)
The course engages students in the practical aspects of offering pastoral care in various ministerial, cultural and family contexts: Students practice listening, prayer, conflict mediation and pastoral theological reflection; students apply narrative theology, brief pastoral counseling, and Biblical themes to pastoral caregiving; and students learn skills of non-anxious care in crisis situations.

PCC 3301: Pastoral Care in the Church (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to Pastoral Care with an emphasis on clinical learning. Students will begin surveying the history of the pastoral care movement and comparing the past with the present as well as viewing the projected future. Interchangeably, the student will experience pastoral care via his/her clinical field assignment. The student’s clinical learning will be extracted by a series of developmental and cognitive methodologies to include: confidential verbatim reports, case studies, theological integration papers, genealogy surveys, short stories of personal experiences and events, reading reports, as well as an evaluating process of the student’s progress via supervision/mentorship sessions with professor, field supervisor, and peer supervision. In combination of the student’s clinical work/evaluation and a thorough reading of the assigned textbooks the student will be given the chance to bring an assessment of self and his/her ministry in regards to the dynamics and approaches that the discipline of pastoral care provides.
PCC 4900: Clinical Pastoral Education I & II or 3 Special Topic courses
Before taking PCC 4900 it is preferred that students take PCC-I 3300 and PCC-II 3301 as your prerequisite. Clinical Pastoral Education will be taken at a (non-church site) CPE Center accredited through either the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) or through the College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychotherapy, Inc. (CPSP). Each CPE course is worth nine credit academic hours and worth one unit (400 hours) of CPE. Students may choose a center from a broad range of institutional settings. However, each CPE unit is subject to acceptance by the CPE center via interview by a CPE supervisor and CPE faculty chaplains. The following CPE Centers are located within healthcare, military, counseling centers, and other institutional settings in the San Antonio area and the Southwest Texas Region:

CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital System, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 704-2011,; Brooke Army Medical Center CPE Center, MCHE PC Bldg 3600/DMPC-CPE, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr., San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 916-1105; Ecumenical Center for Religion and Health 8310 Ewing Halsell Dr., San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 616-0885; Methodist Healthcare System Pastoral Care Services, 7711 Louis Pasteur, Suite 101, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 575-6834; South Texas Veterans HealthCare System Audie L. Murphy Division, 7400 Merton Minter St, Chaplain Service, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 699-2130; Wilford Hall Medical Center, Chaplain Services, 2200 Bergquist Dr., Suite 1, CPE Program, 59th Medical Wing/HC, Lackland A F B, San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 292-7373; Baptist Health System Department of Pastoral Care, 111 Dallas St., San Antonio, TX Phone: (210) 297-7750; Valley Baptist Health System Clinical Pastoral Education Center, Benwood Dr., Harlingen, TX Phone: (956) 389-6750; Driscoll Children’s Hospital, 3533 South Alameda St., Corpus Christi, TX Phone: (361) 694-4504.
In accordance with ACPE and CPSP, CPE hours are divided into two parts: One hundred classroom hours and three hundred clinical hours. Each unit is worth 400 hours. One to four consecutive accredited CPE units can be counted towards credentials to be a professional
chaplain, pastoral care practitioner, and board certified chaplain or as an ecclesiastical ordination/endorsement requirement by a denomination.

PCC 4390: Special Topics in Pastoral Care (3-0-3)
This course offers an in-depth exploration of themes and practices in pastoral care. The course is designed to facilitate a reflection upon the challenges ministers face in different pastoral care settings.

SWO 2301: Ministry and Community (3-0-3)
Students will explore ways ministry outside the walls of the church can take place in mobilizing the church to connect effectively, assess its resources, & meet the needs of the community. The strength based model will serve as a foundational basis in assisting students to equip the local church. An introduction of the systems approach will be presented to help the local church join Christian and secular organizations, and communities in dealing with social, economic, and practical. issues and advocate for justice. A 20-hour service will assist the student in contextualization/practice of the course content.

SWO 2321: Introduction to Social Work (3-0-3)
An introduction to the profession of social work and the institution of social welfare. Emphasis is on common human needs and problems, and the development and functioning of social welfare as an institution of society. Course content includes history, knowledge base, values, and skills of professional social work as well as contexts for practice and career opportunities.

SWO 3351 Human Behavior and the Environment (3-0-3)
Human development across the life course with emphasis on the effects of the social and physical environment on maturation. Special attention given to gender issues, cross-cultural and racial issues, and other special populations.

SWO 3371: Social Work Practice (3-0-3)
The Generalist Model of social work practice, including theoretical frameworks, problem- solving method, values and ethics, and practice with special populations. Thirty hours of service learning work required.

SWO 4390: Special Topics in Social Work (3-0-3)
Course for students who wish to study an area of social work not covered by a formal course.
May be repeated for up to a total of six hours credit when the subject matter varies.

Music: Applied Music

MUSI 0100 Applied Music: Choir (NC for Music Majors)
Students enrolled in choir explore the religious music of different time periods and cultures, singing in a variety of musical styles, and in a variety of languages.

MUSI 0101 Applied Music: Rondalla (NC for Music Majors)
This course explores the contemporary and traditional Christian music repertoire by Mexican/Tejano composers, through this particular element of Mexican musical culture, the Rondalla (an ensemble featuring acoustic guitars and mixed voices).

MUSI 2107 Applied Music: Handbell Ensemble (1-0-1)
The primary purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to develop their musical skills by participating in a handbell ensemble.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 1311 Theory & Musicianship I

MUSI 1101 – MUSI 4102 Applied Music: Piano (1-0-1)
The primary purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to develop their musical potential and ability by learning to play an instrument through individual instruction.

MUSI 1103 – MUSI 4104 Applied Music: Guitar (1-0-1)
The primary purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to develop their musical potential and ability by learning to play an instrument through individual instruction.

MUSI 1105 – MUSI 4106 Applied Music: Voice (1-0-1)
This course provides the student with an opportunity to develop his/her musical potential and ability through singing. Students will learn how to create individual vocal routines, how to train and strengthen their voices, educate and tune their hearing, and build an awareness of the nature of their singing. Students receive individual instruction.

Music: Music Studies

MUSI 1311 Theory and Musicianship I (3-0-3)
An introduction to the rudiments of music, including rhythm and meter, melody, and harmony. It provides students with the basic tools for reading, writing and understanding music, including aural skills (sight singing and ear training).

MUSI 1312 Theory and Musicianship II (3-0-3)
A continuation of Theory and Musicianship I. It includes the study of chord structure through traditional four-part harmony, as well as aural skills.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 1311

MUSI 2311 Theory and Musicianship III (3-0-3)
A continuation of Theory and Musicianship III. Includes the study of non-chord tones, seventh chords and basic formal structure. Students develop skills in analyzing and writing elementary tonal music. Aural skills training continues.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 1312

MUSI 2312 Theory IV: Form and Analysis (3-0-3)
A continuation of Theory and Musicianship III. It completes the study of chromatic harmony and expands the students’ skills in analyzing and writing tonal music.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 2311

MUSI 2321 History of Music Before 1800 (3-0-3)
A survey of Western music history from Antiquity through the eighteenth century.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 1311

MUSI 3301 Conducting (3-0-3)
An introductory course on the art and craft of conducting; includes beginning baton technique as well as score study and analysis; emphasis on choral music.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 2311

MUSI 3303/THEO 3303 Perspectives in Christian Worship (3-0-3)
Study of Christian worship from biblical times to the present. Students will have the opportunity to examine and reflect upon the historical, biblical and theological dimensions of worship; discuss the meaning and importance of the various elements of a worship service; and discuss the role of music in Christian worship.
This course is cross-referenced in the Bachelor of Arts in Biblical-Theological Studies curriculum.

MUSI 3321 History of Music (3-0-3)
A survey of Western music history from the nineteenth century to the present.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 2321

MUSI 3322 Latin American Music (3-0-3)
A survey of Latin American music history from Colonial times to the present.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 3323 American Musical Theater (3-0-3)
This course examines the sources and development of the American musical theater.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 3324 World Music (3-0-3)
A study of music of various world cultures, including its relationship to religion, politics, language and other arts.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 3325 Film Music (3-0-3)
A critical study of music in film.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 3331 Music and Technology (3-0-3)
Survey of available resources for music technology.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 3332 Congregational Song (3-0-3)
Examination of the historical development of congregational music. Students will analyze selected hymns and choruses for textual and musical characteristics, scriptural and theological content, and usefulness in worship. This course also includes discussions on current trends in congregational song, and the impact of culture and education on worship music.

MUSI 4301 Composition and Arranging (3-0-3)
Creative work in arranging and composition for piano, choir, and small instrumental combinations. Analysis of various styles of composition.

MUSI 4321 Opera (3-0-3)
A survey of opera from its origins to the present.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 4322 Jazz (3-0-3)
A historical survey of jazz from its roots through present developments.
Pre-requisite: MUSI 3321

MUSI 4331 Strategies for the Worship Minister (3-0-3)
Survey of methods and materials necessary for effective music ministry. This course examines practical issues relevant to the administrative, educational, and pastoral dimensions of the music ministry. Area music ministers will be invited to share their experiences in the field, and participate in class discussions.
MUSI 4332 Music Pedagogy
This course provides students with a foundation in issues related to teaching music in a variety of settings. It engages students in diverse ways of thinking about music teaching, performance and the production and sharing of musical knowledge.

MUSI 4390 Church Music: Special Topics (3-0-3)
A study of selected topics in the area of church music. May be repeated for credit with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Admission by petition or upon the invitation of a faculty member.
GPA of 3.3 or higher and completion of 60 hours of class work or more.
Registration for this course allowed only if the topic is not offered as a
regularly scheduled course during that semester.

Spanish

SPAN 1401 Beginning Spanish I (for Non-Heritage Speakers) (4-0-4)
This is a multimedia course in conversational Spanish. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar and the acquisition of oral and aural skills. Class is conducted primarily in Spanish and supplemented by a conversation partner program, a computer lab, audio and video components.
Prerequisite: One year of high school Spanish or consent of instructor.

SPAN 1402 Beginning Spanish II (for Non-Heritage Speakers) (4-0-4)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 1401, conducted primarily in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1401

SPAN 2301 Intermediate Spanish I (for Non-Heritage Speakers) (3-0-3)
This is a multimedia course in conversational Spanish. It continues to develop essential grammar, oral and aural skills. Additional emphasis is placed on the development of cultural insights and reading comprehension skills. Class is conducted primarily in Spanish and supplemented by a conversation partner program, a computer lab, audio and video components.
Prerequisite: SPAN 1402

SPAN 2302 Intermediate Spanish II (for Non-Heritage Speakers) (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of SPAN 2301, conducted primarily in Spanish. Additional emphasis is placed on development of oral and writing skills.
Prerequisite: SPAN 2301

SPAN 3301 Advanced Grammar & Composition for Heritage Speakers (3-0-3)
This is an intensive course designed to meet the needs of Hispanic students who already speak the language, but need instruction in reading and writing. It concentrates on structured writing and examines the grammar of Spanish at the advanced level from the perspective of a future Spanish language and culture teacher.
Prerequisite: SPAN 2302 or consent of instructor

SPAN 3302 Spanish Phonology and Morphology (3-0-3)
The course is a contrastive linguistics study of the sound and lexical systems of English and Spanish. The study of its sound system examines the distinct nature of the two vowel and consonant systems, their syllable structure as well as its suprasegmental features. The study of morphology examines word creation. The course looks at the creative nature of the single word in Spanish as compared to the creative nature of word clusters in English. The course takes into account the teaching of Spanish and English.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301

SPAN 3303 Spanish Syntax and Semantics (3-0-3)
The course is a contrastive linguistic study of English and Spanish. The generative and structuralist theoretical models of syntax is explored. Topics include word order and its connections to word morphology as well complex sentence types. The study of semantics examines the meaning of language of verbal systems, adjectives, adverbs and nouns. It includes the study of euphemisms and popular word creation.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3302

SPAN 3310 Hispanic-American Culture and Civilization (3-0-3)
This is an introduction to Hispanic-American culture and civilization, with consideration of geographical, social, economic, political, religious and artistic features. The course includes lectures, collateral readings, as well as written and oral reports. A special feature of the course is the use of films to enhance cultural appreciation. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301 with a grade of “C” or better.

SPAN 3311 Spanish Culture and Civilization (3-0-3)
This is a survey of the culture and civilization of Spain, with consideration of geographical, social, economic, political, religious and artistic features. The course includes lectures, collateral readings, as well as written and oral reports. A special feature of the course is the use of films to enhance cultural appreciation. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301 with a grade of “C” or better.

SPAN 3320 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3-0-3)
This course is a study of basic literary concepts and methods of textual analysis. It serves as an introduction to different literary genres and their historical development. It includes readings from a selection of texts from both Spanish and Hispanic-American literature. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301 with a grade of “C” or better, and SPAN 3310 or 3311.

SPAN 3321 Survey of Mexican-American Culture and Literature (3-0-3)
This course is an introductory study of the most representative Mexican-American writers and their works from the nineteenth century until 1995. Genres covered are: poetry, essay, narrative and theater. It includes collateral readings and reports.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301 with a grade of “C” or better

SPAN 4301 Survey of Hispanic-American Literature I (3-0-3)
This course examines a wide range of genres and representative writers of Hispanic-America, from the Pre-Columbian to the Baroque period. Special consideration is given to the political, historical, social and religious dimensions of this literature. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320

SPAN 4302 Survey of Hispanic-American Literature II (3-0-3)
This course examines a wide range of genres and representative writers of Hispanic-America, from the Neo-Classical period to the present. Special consideration is given to the political, historical, social and religious dimensions of this literature. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320, or taken concurrently with SPAN 3320

SPAN 4311 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3-0-3)
This course examines a wide range of genres and representative writers of Spain, from the Middle-Ages to the eighteenth century. Special consideration is given to the political, historical, social and religious dimensions of this literature. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320

SPAN 4312 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3-0-3)
This course examines a wide range of genres and representative writers of Spain, from the nineteenth century to the present. Special consideration is given to the political, historical, social and religious dimensions of this literature. Class is conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320, or taken concurrently with SPAN 3320

SPAN 4320 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of translation from English to Spanish. Students must have a strong command of spoken Spanish and English as well as a solid knowledge of Spanish and English grammar and syntax in order to succeed in this course.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320 and a passing score on an entry examination

SPAN 4321 Theory and Practice in Spanish Translation (3-0-3)
This course examines in detail the translation process and focuses on the legal, financial medical, advertisement and literary fields, so that students gain competence to do a professional translation from English to Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 4320

SPAN 4322 Spanish Editing and Proofreading (3-0-3)
This course focuses on Spanish proofreading and editing techniques, and examines in detail the process of correction of errors, including spelling, punctuation, capitalization, accent marks, and accuracy of translation. Emphasis also is given to formatting and the use of copy/editing symbols and style manuals.
Prerequisite: SPAN 4321

SPAN 4330 Spanish for Teachers (3-0-3)
This course is an examination of a wide variety of approaches and methods of language teaching, such as: traditional approaches, current communicative approaches, as well as, alternative methods (e.g. Total Physical Response, Suggestopedia, Community Language Learning, Multiple Intelligences, Competency-Based Language Teaching etc.). After students reflect on their own experiences as language learners, participants evaluate different teaching methods by staging a short teaching sequence as a classroom presentation. Students design their own detailed lesson plans incorporating theory and application, and learn strategies for teaching culture, the use of instructional media and technology, and assessment of learner performance. Students have hands-on practice in a real language classroom under the instructor’s supervision.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3303, SPAN 3310 or 3311, and SPAN 3320

SPAN 4340 Special Topic: Hispanic-American Culture through Film (3-0-3)
This course is a study of Hispanic-American culture (Mexico, Central and South America, as well as the Spanish-speaking Caribbean) through the medium of film. The content of selected cultural topics is examined, as well as the use of the medium of film to communicate the Hispanic-American culture.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor

SPAN 4360 Special Topics: The Chicano Novel (3-0-3)
This course is an in-depth study of the most representative novels written by Mexican-American authors, beginning with Pocho, by José Antonio Villarreal, and ending with the most recent novels written in English by Alejandro Morales, Rolando Hinojosa-Smith and Rudolfo Anaya.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320

SPAN 4370 Special Topics: Spanish-American Short-Story (3-0-3)
This course is a study of the most relevant authors and short stories written in Spanish-America from the Romantic to the Postmodern period. Collateral readings and reports.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3320

SPAN 4380 Special Topics: Spanish for Business (3-0-3)
This course will prepare Spanish and Business Leadership majors for successful oral and written communication in the Hispanic business world. It builds on the student’s knowledge and place special emphasis on essential business terminology and real-life use of the Spanish language in common business contexts. This course also helps the student become culturally aware of the differences in doing business in Hispanic countries or with Hispanics in the United States.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301 with a grade of “C” or better

SPAN 4390 Special Topics: Culture and History of Mexico (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to the history and culture of Mexico from a Mexican perspective. It starts in the Pre-Columbian period and covers all major events in Mexican history until the 21st Century. Emphasis is placed on the political, social, economic, religious and artistic spheres of Mexican culture. Collateral readings and reports.
Prerequisite: SPAN 3301 with a grade of “C” or better

SPAN 4390 Special Topics: Spanish Culture and Civilization (3-0-3)

College Readiness Studies

DEVL 0109 Introduction to Computer Literacy (3-0-0)
Introduction to Computer Applications is designed to familiarize students with computers and their applications. It will also emphasize the use of computers and technology throughout their college careers. Students will learn fundamental concepts of computer hardware and software and become familiar with a variety of computer applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and multimedia presentations. Students will also investigate Internet base applications, working with email and learning how to browse the web.

DEVL 0300 Basic English (3-0-0)
This course focuses on contextual grammar usage, active vocabulary building, and multi-paragraph essay writing. Attention is placed on planning, drafting, and revision of essays to prepare students for college-level writing classes.

DEVL 0303 Developmental Reading (3-0-0)
This course focuses on development of reading comprehension, vocabulary, and study skills.

DEVL 0304 Developmental Writing (3-0-0)
This course focuses on extensive grammar and multi-paragraph essay writing practice, with attention to planning, drafting, and revision, to prepare students for college-level writing classes.

DEVL 0306 Developmental Mathematics I (3-0-0)
Study of basic mathematics such as arithmetic operations, basic algebraic concepts and notations, integers, fractions, decimals, and percentages.

DEVL 0307 Developmental Mathematics II (3-0-0)
Continuation of the study of basic mathematics such as arithmetic operations, basic algebraic concepts and notations, integers, fractions, decimals, and percentages.

DEVL 0308 Developmental Algebra (3-0-0)
A study of relations and functions, inequalities, factoring, polynomials, rational expressions, and quadratics with an introduction to complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, determinants and metrics, and sequences and series.

DEVL 0310 Study Skills for Success (3-0-0)
Study of techniques such as time management listening and note taking, text marking, library and research skills, preparing for examinations, and utilizing learning resources. Includes courses in college orientation and developmental of students’ academic skills that apply to all disciplines.

INRW 0301 Integrated Reading and Writing I (3-0-0)
This course is an integration of DEVL 0300 and DEVL 0303. This college-prep course focuses on study skills, reading comprehension, contextual grammar usage, active vocabulary building, and paragraph writing. When a student passes this course with a C or above, the student will have satisfied reading and writing requirements and will be ready for INRW 0302.

INRW 0302 Integrated Reading and Writing II (3-0-0)
This course is an integration of DEVL 0300 and DEVL 0303. This college-prep course focuses on critical reading and academic writing skills. It is designed for students who need to improve reading and writing effectiveness with multi-paragraph, college-level texts. Students will give oral and written responses to texts representative of a variety of disciplines and genres. Strong emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing skills. Successful completion of this college-prep course with a grade of “C” or better prepares the student for ENGL 1301.

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